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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
that print only the nixon materials. by law, richard nixon's materials could not leave 20 miles outside of the district of columbia because it was felt that richard nixon was not a trustworthy conservator of his material. so they couldn't have a library. by law, he couldn't have a live repaired and that is because richard nixon had cut a deal and congress found out about it. he cut a deal with one of his appointees who was the head of the gao. i'm sorry, the gsa. it is the government services administration appeared at those -- in those days, they ran the national archives. the deal was that richard nixon would have the tapes in five years and could destroy whatever he wanted. whatever was not presented for truck, he could destroy and he could have his papers and destroy them appeared richard nixon cut this deal before he left the white house. congress found out about it, went crazy and seized his materials. that meant that the nixon materials were like a crime scene. i am telling you, running the nixon library is one of the most phenomenal experiences one could have. because what happe
remarkable icons. east dwight eisenhower and richard nixon. the two men were at the center of the american political stage for over to the p.o. decades. it's even though nixon was eisenhower's vice-president, said they had a tense and often distrustful relationship. he writes about it in his new book. i spoke with him a little bit earlier. you remember eisenhower as a war hero and richard nixon as the disgraced president brought low by watergate. worthy meant more similar than we think? >> there personalities could not have been more different. nixon would always be nixon, always insecure. eisenhower but always be eisenhower. i asked somebody what he was like and they said that he would go all five star on you. >> eisenhower was very suspicious of political -- corera politicians. why did he choose him? >> he did not choose them. when eisenhower was nominated for president in 1952, he was not even aware that he made a choice. i am the one who does it? as opposed to the delegates. yes, it is you. >> why was the relationship so difficult for nixon? >> nixon was always wasawe of eisenhower. ni
to richard nixon. and richard nixon vetoed it even though it passed with lots of republican votes. president nixon said the idea of preschool for everyone had quote, family-weakening implications. he said quote, the child development envisioned in this legislation would be truly a long leap into the dark for the united states government and the american people. a long leap into the dark. 40 years after president nixon said no to preschool for all american kids with the weird leaping in the dark analogy, president obama is trying to bring a version of that idea back with a plan for early education for all americans. but this time the president has wind in his sails blowing in from an unlikely source. it's blowing in from a really, really red state. from maybe the reddest of all red states. this is how oklahoma voted in 2012. mitt romney swept every county. in 2008 john mccain swept every county. in 2004 george bush swept every county. oklahoma is the reddest place we've got in america. and republicans, you may have heard, like to think that they do not think much of the policy ideas of barack
with a future president, richard nixon. in fact, you could call them the original frenemies. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics and cool black and white footage. wears off. been there. tried that. ladybug body milk? no thanks. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. it's so powerful you can skip a day... but light enough you won't want to. dermatologist recommended eucerin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. [ male announcer ] we began with the rx. ♪ then we turned the page, creating the rx hybrid. ♪ now we've turned the page again with the rx f sport. ♪ this is the next chapter for the rx and the next chapter for lexus. this is the pursuit of perfection. and the next chapter for lexus. what do we do when something really wants to be painted? we break out new behr ultra with stain-blocker from the home depot... ...the best selling paint and primer in one that now eliminates stains. so it paints over stained surfaces, scuffed surfaces, just
or republican. i voted for richard nixon, ronald reagan, but after the george bush fiasco, the republicans will not give back the tax cuts that george bush's friends liked and they still like thim. they want to get rid of things people need like social security and medicare. host: paul is a republican. caller: good morning. favorite is george bush. host: george w. or george h. w.? caller: george w. bush. host: why? out, iot going to find guess. let's go to democratic caller in iowa. caller: good morning. my favorite is john f. kennedy. he was brilliant. when he gave his inaugural address, he started the peace corps and he brought young kids to help out with the country. he and his brothers were for the poor. it was not just for the rich. he's my favorite. thank you. host: we will keep getting your thoughts on your favorite president throughout the first part of the morning. let me give you some other headlines in the papers. the new york times front page -- next to that is the story about obama's plan for citizenship that was put out on saturday. it says none of the 11 million illegal immi
, the federal communications division, the department of commerce and powerful quarters in the richard nixon white house itself. in a few crowded years tom and his merry band dispatch them all with a competitive open skies policy in place of a post office style communication satellites monopoly. with the first launch of a private commercial satellite in 1974, with the manifesto and government industry accord that laid the groundwork for a cable system that was no longer a long extension cord for broadcast television but instead a robust alternative with hundreds of channels suited every taste and interests. and it would be essential first steps towards today system the universal 24/7 wireless, voice and data communications, practically available to every home, office and handbag on the planet. tom was working in a white house where intellectual bandwidth was appreciated ,-com,-com ma dominated by the likes of henry kissinger, daniel patrick moynihan, george shultz, arthur byrnes, james questions are. in his company's reputation had risen so high by the spring of 1974 that he was tapped to ch
and richard nixon vetoed that legislation. so congress can do it in 1971. they sure as hell can do it in 2013 and they should. what do you think. 1-866-55-press. >> announcer: this is the "full court press." the "bill press show" live on your radio and on current tv. for true stories. with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines. real, gripping, current. documentaries... on current tv. irene, drop the itch. we dropped the itch, you can too. maximum strength scalpicin® is not a shampoo so you can stop intense itch fast, wherever you are. i dropped the itch. drop the itch with scalpicin®. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out
strategy with strom thurmond and those boys? >> that's why the great gary wills said richard nixon was the last liberal and there is a reference, willie brown is right, there should have been more, in a longer piece there would be more on that, on the philadelphia plan, but, yes, affirmative action, a phrase originated in the kennedy years, was seized on by the nixon administration. hey, daniel patrick moynihan said about nixon, this guy is not trying to undo the great society, he wants to outdo it. and what happened? ideologues within the conservative movement turned against nixon. >> well -- >> women -- >> let me go to willie brown. i know nixon. i'm not necessarily a nixon hater by any means. he was a member of the naacp in the '50s. pret friendly with whitney young, getting to know martin luther king ahead of the kennedys. and then becomes a totally mean guy in terms of electoral politics, hooking up with strom thurmond figuring he was going to grab what was left of the segregationists in the south when they were dispointed with the democrats. what happened to this guy? >> i th
to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul paul wormser anm acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you, into one american canoeing author top presentations. today we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who was born 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of the research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement then she has written to date three different books. that's been turning right at the 16th, capture of the gop, wives and mothers and the conservative fundament crusade against communism and of course the book with a fast run here, which is "pat nixon: embattled first lady." her book is an outstanding work and i look forward -- our thank you to help me welcome her on the stage to talk about her work. mary brennan. [applause] >> thank you, paula. such a great honor to be back at the nixon library. as paul said i did much of my research here and i feel very close to all the people he
's curse of the bambino, it has dogged leaders for the past century. richard nixon called for working together in his 1974 address, one year after his landslide re-election. >> i want you to know that i have no intention whatever of ever walking away from the job that the people elected me to do for the people of the united states. >> instead, two months later, nixon owned up to his role in watergate and eventually resigned. ronald reagan was swept into a second term with an historic 49 state landslide. >> there are no constraints on the human mind, no walls around the human spirit, no barriers to our progress except those we ourselves erect. >> but many of his second term domestic plans fell to the wayside as his administration was consumed by the iran contra scandal. in 1997 after leading americans through four years of economic growth, president bill clinton promised something that hasn't been done in three decades. >> we must keep our economy the strongest in the world. we here tonight have an historic opportunity. let this congress be the congress that finally balances the budget
kiss begins with kay ♪ anniversary of richard nixon's birth there's a new exhibit at his presidential library and has a lot of people talking. it contains newly declassified documents that reveal that nixon was corresponding with president bill clinton. jan crawford is here with the story. good morning. >> good morning, norah, good morning, j.b. they have released these incredible documents and it shows a surprisingly warm relationship between presidents nixon and clinton. the correspondence includes a handwritten letter congratulating him on a tough primary and election. that letter was the beginning of an unlikely union between the former republican and the democrat. they say politics make strange bedfellows. that was the case in 1992 when he sent a hand-written note to president clinton. the strongest steel must pass through the hottest fire. in enduring that ordeal you have demonstrate thad you have the character to lead. >> it's a very fascinating letter because he's opening up the door to a new incoming president that i'm on your side that i'm impressed by
about. richard nixon, who was eisenhower's vice president, said that eisenhower was more complicated and devious than most people realize, and then nixon said i mean devious in the best sense of the word. [laughter] now, ike was human. the stress did get to him. he had a heart attack in 1955, a stroke in 1957, chronic stomach problems, a stomach operation in 1956. one of the most useful records of ike's life is the diary that was kept by his personal doctor, howard snyder. and the diary's very explicit about the medications and his mood. they were worried about his mood, because they were afraid that high blood pressure and that he would pop a cork, and it would give him another heart attack. so the doctors were always telling eisenhower not to worry so much, and he would say just what do you think this job is? of course he worried. he had a lot to worry about. and he occasionally erupted. he threw his golf club at his doctor and almost broke his leg, not exactly great sportsmanship, but it was on the same day that eisenhower was deciding whether or whether or not to do a u2 flight o
and was not removed from office. richard nixon left office and was not removed. they were eligible to receive benefits provided to former presidents. it is not tested whether somebody removed by impeachment would receive these benefits. host: a right-wing response to the comments about george w. bush saying he saved your hide from the terrorists. when do the presidents receive this money? is it one payout each year or monthly? guest: i believe it is a monthly pension. i do not think they get one installment. host: do the presidents request the amount of money they need for different things and break it down for the government? guest: they talk to the office of management and budget. it comes out in the president's budget recommendations about what they have said they will need for that year. a lot of it is set by statute. office space is negotiated through gsa. host: we will go to bill, arlington, texas, independent caller. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was a teacher years back. this was one of the projects i gave on the benefits and pensions for presidents. i was amazed at the research that
hero, eisenhower, the soldier of democracy. and the purely pragmatic political guy, richard nixon, who was essentially forced on eisenhower's ticket by party regulars. and eisenhower was wary of nixon, but also realized he had great political strengths. nixon knew or learned eventually that eisenhower was actually an extraordinary political leader. each learned something from the other. and nixon never quite got out from eisenhower's shadow. there's a great moment in the 1968 republican convention when nixon, at last, you know, is going to be -- now, he'd run in 1960 and lost. here's his chance to win. and what does he say? let's win it for ike. can't get away from ike. >> how about what ike said about nixon in '68, when they asked him about, name one important decision that dick nixon had any input in, and he said, i'll have to get back to you. >> exactly! >> give me a week. >> that was actually 1960, when nixon had been vice president. >> '60, yeah. >> yeah, joe writes, ike and dick is a highly engrossing political narrative that skillfully takes the reader through the twisted develo
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)